Richman Technology filed complaints on Tuesday in the Western District of Texas against Google and Samsung for patent infringement, alleging that the defendants participated in infringement through their security systems’ features and functionality. A few days before filing these suits, the plaintiff also sued ADT and Bosch for similar allegations.

The patents-in-suit are United States Patent Nos.  7,990,268 (the ’268 Patent); 8,174,378 (the ’378 Patent); 8,981,933 (the ’933 Patent); 9,449,484 (the ’484 Patent); and 8,350,698 (the ’698 Patent), all of which relate to a security system or security monitoring.

Google allegedly infringed at least claim 13 of the ’933 patent, which protects a “security system, comprising: a sensor device configured to detect conditions at a site and provide signals indicative of the conditions detected, and a headquarters processor configured to receive the signals from the sensor device, wherein the headquarters processor is configured to process the signals to determine an action to be taken if an event has occurred, wherein the action includes at least one of notifying a human guard of the event and sending instructions to a human guard.” 

Google’s home security system, Nest Secure Alarm System, contains “security cameras, a connected lock, a video doorbell, and four additional Nest Detect sensors.” Furthermore, if the alarm is triggered, a user will “get a security alert” on his or her phone. A user can check the “Nest app to see what triggered the alarm – either a door or window opened or someone entered a room.” Then a user “can call the police or (his or her) emergency contacts.” Thus, Google’s security system senses conditions at a site and provides a signal to the central system, which notifies a user about the condition and if further action should be taken, such as calling the police. For the aforementioned reasons, the plaintiff alleged that this system and process infringe this patent.

Samsung allegedly infringed at least claim 17 of the ’484 patent through its accused products. Claim 17 includes a “method comprising: generating sensor signals at a plurality of sensors configured to detect conditions at a site: transmitting the sensor signals to a headquarters processor configured to receive sensor signals from multiple sites, wherein the headquarters processor is configured to process the signals to determine an action to be taken if an event has occurred.” Samsung’s SmartThings Sensors uses sensors to create a smart home. It allows a user to “receive alerts when there’s unexpected activity in your home,” “monitor moisture and temperature,” and “know when there’s movement in your home.” Thus, the sensors are used to “detect conditions at a site” as described in the patent. 

Furthermore, the sensors are wirelessly connected to the Samsung SmartThings cloud, which allows the cloud to receive the sensor information and data. As a result, Richman Tech averred that this device and system infringed on its patent as exemplified above.

The defendants are accused of direct, indirect, and contributory infringement. Richman Technology has sought declaratory judgment, an accounting and award for damages, compensation for defendants’ alleged infringement, an award for costs and expenses, and other relief. The plaintiff is represented by Rabicoff Law LLC.